Obama’s Last Budget Raises Taxes; Will Republicans Cave Again?

Obama’s Last Budget

President Obama has submitted a massive $4.15 TRILLION budget to complete his last year in office . . . but the impact will last ten years.

Americans will pay an additional $3.4 trillion in taxes over the next decade in the form of increased gas taxes and increased taxes on the “wealthy.”

Obama plans to milk out another $10 for each barrel of oil to steal another $320 billion from taxpayers – the money will go to Obama’s Blade Runner vision of bullet trains and driverless cars.

The president also wants $19 billion for Cyber Security, which is laughable as the Obama administration spent $2.1 billion to build the Obamacare Web site.

In the corporate world, a complex site that links in large consumer databases would cost at max, a few million dollars – although it could be done correctly for only a few hundred thousand dollars.

But this is the same government that spends $436 on hammers and $640 on toilet seats.

Obama’s 2017 budget will be the largest proposal ever submitted to Congress. To make matters worse, it’s out of balance by $616 billion in 2016 and $544 billion in 2017.

Over the next decade, the budget will increase the national debt by another $9.8 trillion. That’s a 51% increase on the current debt of $19 trillion owed by the federal government.

By 2026, each individual taxpayer will owe a jaw-dropping $240,722 in debt that has been run up by elected leaders.

Republicans in Congress have caved to President Obama consistently in the past over the budget.

In October of last year . . . at 3 am in the morning . . . Republicans in Congress passed a budget “deal” that lifted the debt ceiling for Obama.

While the 3 am deal was orchestrated by former House Speaker John Boehner, the current speaker, Paul Ryan, was quick to pass his own budget travesty in December of last year.

When it comes to spending, neither Democrats nor Republicans can be trusted.

Obama’s new budget includes $1.1 billion for heroin and prescription pill addicts, but critics say that the funds should be instead allocated for spending addiction for politicians.